Domestic violence (abuse) support

Domestic violence (or domestic abuse) affects more people than we realise and includes not just physical, psychological and sexual abuse, but also economic abuse, digital abuse and coercive control. This can happen to anyone in a relationship, or between family members. 

If you or someone you know are at risk, you can reach out to one of these national or local support services, including the police and refuges. 
 

National and local support services 

  • Slough | Hestia (Slough) emergency refuge:  01753 477 352 

  • Bright Sky app | Hestia the app gives free information and a directory of specialist support, (available in English, Urdu, Punjabi, Polish & Welsh), as well as an ‘am I at risk’ questionnaire, all while being disguised as a weather app to keep you safe. 

 

More information 

Domestic abuse: how to get help - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) 

Domestic Abuse Directory - Women’s Aid 

Live Chat | Women's Aid Live Chat (womensaid.org.uk) 

What should I do if I'm experiencing relationship conflicts or domestic abuse? 

 

Support for specific groups 

All of the Domestic Abuse support services will help anyone affected, but the following services are tailored to support specific groups: 

 

Signs to look out for in colleagues 

It can be hard disclosing abuse and studies have shown those in abusive relationships actually do want to be asked if they are ok. If we see some of the signs listed below in our work colleagues we shouldn't be afraid to ask them if they are OK, or if they need to talk:  

  • Changes in the quality of their work for no apparent reason  

  • Changes in behaviour, problems concentrating, withdrawing, distracted or anxious and depressed  

  • Arriving late or leaving early or arriving early and leaving late with no explanation  

  • Increased sickness/absenteeism -Receiving frequent calls/ messages from partner during work time  

  • Unexplained injuries  

  • Clothing that may be hiding injuries  

This list is not exhaustive….  

By sensitively asking if they are okay, you’re not going to make things worse.  

If your colleague does disclose they are experiencing abuse:  Listen, believe and suggest they speak to a specialist domestic abuse service, which you can find on this page. You don't have to sort it all out or tell them what to do.  Listening without judgment can be really helpful.

 

If you need urgent mental health support and advice:

  • Call NHS 111 for physical or mental health emergencies (available 24/7)
  • Samaritans: call 116 123 (available 24/7)
  • SHOUT85258: text 'SHOUT' to 85258 (available 24/7)

Always dial 999 in an emergency or, to contact the Police in a non-emergency, use 101.